MAILBIRD – ‘Gracefully Unifying Email Clients On Windows’

MAILBIRD – 'Gracefully Unifying Email Clients On Windows'
“I find very few folks are watching their Facebook feed, some are watching their Twitter feed, and all of them are watching their email box. So, while social networks are nice, email is still the killer application.”
– Jason Calacanis

Emails, or to be specific mails and messages, tend to play an integral part in our daily lives. Apart from the irritating spam and promotional stuff, they are something that we tend to look up to for information and for reply to our queries.Newsletters, office mails, blog posts, transactions and many more criteria fill up our inboxes every day.With multiple mail sources, client, subscribers and fans alike, email management and its related services are of vital importance to the overall email client’s success as well as the overall performance in business and our work in general.

Mailbird,

as described by its founder Andrea Loubier, is anemail client for Windows OS that unifies online communication with multiple email accounts, productivity apps and speed, that is molded into one complete app.

The idea for such a unified email client was due to the frustrations faced with the presently in use email being on Windows, and knowing that something better and different could be done from Microsoft Outlook.Sparrow for Mac was a big inspiration for them, it’s simple, clean, fast and intuitive email client for Mac OS that worked really well with Gmail.Mailbird works with more than just Gmail though, and it has all kinds of great apps to help users do more with their time efficiently and effectively.

Understanding the most active users and minimizingthe friction of switching from one email client to another was one of the major hurdlesthey faced. They were alsobuilding a global companyand so had significant work to do in terms oflocalized marketing outreach in regionswhere English wasn’t a commonly used language.
But by keeping these demanding obstacles aside, they kept pursuing their idea. They launched the company in a geographic location that used different languages, marketing channels and cultures. Within a limited time, they learned that doing a localized geographic launch would require at least 1 month of preparation work to build a significant presence in that geographic market. They did learn to hire a local marketing team in that specific region to help with those cultural nuances and social channels that were not able to be used to the fullest of potential as before.
Throughout the journey there have been failures and struggles but through failure is how one gains the experience and ultimately becomes better at growing and managing one’s business.So the aforementioned poor research on a localized geographic launch, not knowing how to pitch the business to investors, not understanding cash flow or cap tables, hiring the wrong people, outsourcing work etc. were some of the notable errors they made initially. Although having made those mistakes, it has proved valuable for them as they provided the best learning opportunities for the team at Mailbird to do better in all facets of the business.The failures are always critical for developing a new business, they teach you how to do better and how to succeed. Since these failures, they’ve discovered more ways to succeed with the revised Mailbird service and the entire team is positive and rearing to go further.

When we interviewed Andrea Loubier regarding the different roles that she had to take up during the entire startup’s journey, this is what she commented, “

Well,as the CEO of the company, and as many CEO’s will share,you wear many different hats.You do marketing, you are the public figure representing the company. I’ve been a part of the HR department, I’ve been in a team and acted as a project manager, the grammar checker, the motivator, the glue, the PR specialist, the speaker, the feedback giver, the problem solver, the negotiator, the sales person, the customer happiness director. I’ve done quality assurance and control, convincing everyone that the impossible is possible. I’ve been the biggest cheerleader for our team, customers and business. You wear many hats, but you never have a dull day. In the end, my main role is to support the awesome people behind Mailbird and also the business and to set milestones and goals for future visionary developments of Mailbird

.”

Truly with the level of commitment she has showcased the efforts put up by her team, there is no question about Mailbird’s rise to success and the recognition they are getting. And their success lies in the overall character and mindset that Andrea Loubier herself portrays.She is a big advocate for women in executive or lead roles, especially in pursuing occupations in technology. She didn’t come from a technological background. That and the pressure of going up against the email giants never stopped her.You learn to be confident and relentless in pursuing success for your company that you created from the ground up, and this is what she believes in. 2017 is indeed a great year for more women to jump into tech and hold the reins of the businesses.She hopes that her story with Mailbird can be an example of the possibilities for women that want to build a great business from the ground up, be their own boss, set their own rules, learn how to build confidence and continue the cycle of success of female entrepreneurs in tech.
As with any venture or startup, the success story is always going to begin with the efforts and endeavors of the core team.The surest reason why many new companies/startups fail is because of the lack of cohesion and pace of the people inside the company. Andrea Loubier takes great pride in having built an incredible team for Mailbird in pursuing the best email client in the world that innovates with technology in unifying online communication. Without the constant inputs and hard-work from the incredible team, Mailbird wouldn’t be where it is today.An important aspect of team building is the necessity of a diverse culture and skill levels, because it brings a concrete level of cohesion and balance in the organization as a whole.
Concluding this inspiring and truly effective solution from Mailbird with Stewart Butterfield’s quote,“Email has the virtue – sounds like a bad thing, but it’s the virtue of being the lowest common denominator messaging protocol. Everyone can have it. It can cross organizational boundaries. No one owns it. It’s not some particular company’s platform.”

Source: MyStartupStory

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